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Texas-No We Won't

Uniting Texans for the purpose of Preserving Our State, Our Country and Our Freedoms.

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Governor Rick Perry

 

First Lady of Texas Anita and Governor Rick Perry.


Republican presidential candidate Texas Governor Rick Perry (L), stands with his wife Anita, as he is introduced at a house party in Greenland, New Hampshire, in this August 13, 2011 photograph. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

 

GOD BLESS TEXAS AND GOD BLESS THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Greg Abbott and Cecilia Abbott and daughter Audrey.

Gregg Abbott is running for Governor of Texas in 2014 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greg_Abbott

Wendy Davis  Senator 2009

Democrat Running for Governor 

Wendy Davis 2013.jpeg
 


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This flag displays the pride and glory that resides deep in the heart of Texas. The flag of the lone star state is simple. The blue stands for loyalty; the white is for purity; and the red represents bravery. These traits are well known by any Texan, and this is a flag to fly with pride to show off your native colors.

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Comment by Donna-Repub on January 7, 2012 at 12:21am

Governor Perry at NASDAQ in New York City.

Flickr Photo: Governor Perry at NASDAQ in New York City.

Governor Perry travels to NASDAQ headquarters to let them know that Texas is open for business.

Comment by Donna-Repub on January 7, 2012 at 12:18am

Bus Stop at Fatz Cafe

Flickr Photo: Bus Stop at Fatz Cafe

Rick Perry made a bus stop at Fatz’ Cafe in Gaffney, SC. Talking about the 3 key components to getting America working again: Don’t spend all the money. Keep taxes low and regulations fair. And invest aggressively in job creation, because good jobs make the American Dream possible.

Comment by Donna-Repub on January 7, 2012 at 12:15am

Flickr Photo: Rick Perry visits the Old Town Bistro

Rick Perry visits Old Town Bistro in Rock Hill, SC. Greeted by supporters, he speaks about how to get America back on track.

Comment by Donna-Repub on January 4, 2012 at 2:43pm

Well I refused to think that Governor Perry was bowing out.

I feel like, the establishment is trying to make Mitt Romney the Leader of the GOP. Now I learned that Rick Santorum supported Mitt Romney in 2008, I feel like Establishment is doing all they can to make Mitt Romney the one.

They are trying to ignore Rick Perry, by brushing him off, like he is not a contender, I hope and pray the Tea Party people that are called Leaders will clue in and see what some of us Tea Party people that are on the outside are seeing.

Well Let's keep praying for Governor Rick Perry,

So what Gov. Perry stumbled with his words, I am quite sure if you watch carefully you will see other Candidates  stumble their words too.

So Let's Cheer Governor Perry on because Governor Rick Perry is the one with the most experience.

Isaiah 40:30-31

Even youths grow tired and weary, and young men stumble and fall. 31 but those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles, they will walk and not be faint.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Z_M9366Imk

Third Day - "Eagle"

Comment by Michael Colwell on January 4, 2012 at 6:58am

Texas Guardsmen Warn of Iranian Influence in Iraq

 

Texas Guardsmen Warn of Iranian Influence in Iraq


Military analysts and Middle East experts have spent years warning about the growing influence of Iran in Iraq. A group of Texas National Guardsmen watched it firsthand.

As one of the last U.S. units to deploy to Iraq, the Texas Army Guardsmen told congressional lawmakers in late November the Iraqi army still struggles to disseminate intelligence and manage logistics, leaving their soldiers vulnerable to outside influence. Iraqi soldiers spend weeks by themselves, without supplies or relief, on posts dispersed across the Iran-Iraq border.

“The malign influence that exists there now will probably continue to be there after the U.S. military leaves,” said Army Maj. Gen. Eddy Spurglin, head of the 36th Infantry Division, who headed the Texas Guardsmen that returned this summer.

Spurgin and his soldiers didn’t witness the kinds of brash power plays that Iran’s military leadership has made in the past two weeks -- naval exercises near the Strait of Hormuz, and warning that a U.S. aircraft carrier must never return to the Persian Gulf.

Iran has threatened to close the Strait in the past, and Pentagon officials vowed again Tuesday that U.S. Navy warships will continue their deployments. But this year, for the first time since 2003, the U.S. no longer has soldiers on the ground in Iraq to stem Iran’s influence there.

With the Iranian-backed Shia Dawa party controlling much of Baghdad and southern Iraq, Spurgin’s unit of 700 Guardsmen witnessed the small pieces of economic and political influence affecting the Iraqi government and army.

For example, Army Brig. Gen. William Smith, 36th Infantry’s deputy commander, said he worried the Iraqi army’s shaky logistics system would open up doors for Iranian agents to gain favor inside army operations.

Iraq’s supply chain still works on a paper system that depends on approvals from officers as senior as generals for supplies as basic as tires. That’s in addition to the reality that Iraq has no system in place to deliver supplies to units in the field from the country’s only depots, located at Taji.

So if an Iraqi army unit needs tires for Humvees in Basrah, for example, that unit must travel all the way to Taji to pick them up. Of course, it’s rare for a unit commander to approve such a trip because it shows he’s failed as a leader if his unit needs new tires, Smith explained.

“It’s part of the military culture we’re trying to change over there,” he said.

If soldiers can’t depend on their army to supply them, they must look elsewhere. In many cases, they turn to supplies smuggled over the Iran border.

Those smuggling efforts included the ingredients to build improvised explosive devices. Iran’s special operations unit, known as the Quds Force, trained many of the Iraq militia members who execute the smuggling operations inside Iraq, Spurgin said.

The Texas soldiers didn’t focus solely on advanced military operations out of Iran. In a briefing to a Texas congressional delegation on Capitol Hill, the Guardsmen explained how something as simple as groceries allows Iran’s government to gain power in Iraq.

Iran is flooding Iraq’s markets with goods at much cheaper prices than other imports, leading other countries’ suppliers, in places such as Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, to not bother to sell in Iraq. Those supplies allow Iran to control southern Iraq’s markets and thus its stomachs.

“It really means more than you might think,” Smith told Republican Rep. Mike Conaway, a member of the Armed Services Committee. “It’s really going to be a big problem for them in the future.”

The Iraqi army also continues to struggle to set up its intelligence network, Spurgin said. The soldiers don’t have an effective, decentralized system to spread information securely and efficiently across the country.

When asked by Conaway if the Iraqis could protect their borders from an external threat such as Iran, he bluntly said no. Spurgin told the congressman the Iraqis could not defend against an invading force.

“Operationally, the Iraqi Army has the ability to provide internal security of their own country, but they’re not ready to defend their country from an external threat,” Spurgin said.

© Copyright 2012 Military.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Safe LZ's
Michael
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Pursuant to Title 17 U.S.C. 107, this is provided for educational purposes, research, critical comment, or debate without profit or payment.
Comment by Michael Colwell on January 2, 2012 at 5:48pm

Is this what you Mean Donna ?

 

 

Comment by Michael Colwell on January 2, 2012 at 5:25pm

chicagotribune.com

Rick Perry: Iowa caucuses only the beginning of 'marathon' GOP race

By Paul West

1:47 PM CST, January 2, 2012

Reporting from Sioux City, Iowa

Advertisement

Facing weak poll numbers and the very real possibility of a bottom-tier finish in Iowa's kickoff caucuses, Rick Perry on Monday likened the 2012 Republican presidential contest to a marathon that was still in its first mile.
Speaking to supporters in the faux-rustic lobby of a modern hotel near the banks of the Missouri River, Perry said the early stages of a long race are often misleading, and he predicted that other candidates would "hit the wall" later on.
A distance runner before being slowed by back problems, the Texas governor said, "I finished my marathon, and I expect to finish this marathon as well." He said conservatives "don't have to settle for something less than what your values are."
Perry predicted that "every day that goes by, we're going to get stronger," and he called himself the only GOP contender who could combine an outsider message with, "more importantly," an "ability to raise the money to go all the way through."
His upbeat comments came in response to a question from a supporter, who remarked that Perry was "down in the polls" right now and asked what the governor could do to make his candidacy more appealing to voters who want to get behind a winner.
The intense media attention surrounding the caucuses, and a proliferation of public polling that comes out almost daily, has many activists focused on the issue of electability in a year in which defeating President Obama is the most important issue for many GOP voters.
Perry, whose poor early debate performances hurt him, perhaps irreparably, repeated his line about not being the best debater but being so eager to take on Obama in the fall that he would show up early for the debates.
A group of prominent Texans, including state lawmakers and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, joined Perry for the closing hours of the Iowa campaign. They will be traveling along with the candidate, his wife Anita and their two children in a caravan across the most conservative half of the state.
Perry is making three stops in western Iowa on the last full day of campaigning for the caucuses. His final event Monday will be in Perry, Iowa, about an hour northwest of Des Moines, at the meticulously restored Hotel Pattee.
In keeping with what has been so far the most memorable aspect of the Perry candidacy -- verbal gaffes -- the day began with Mike Skaggs, a local Perry campaign leader in Sioux City, thanking the crowd of about 100 or so "for coming out to see the next governor of the United States."
He was followed by publisher Steve Forbes, a Perry supporter and former GOP presidential candidate who finished second in the 2000 Iowa caucuses. "It's my honor and privilege," Forbes said, "to introduce the next president of the United States."
paul.west@latimes.com

Safe LZ's
Michael
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Pursuant to Title 17 U.S.C. 107, this is provided for educational purposes, research, critical comment, or debate without profit or payment.
Comment by Donna-Repub on January 1, 2012 at 12:54am

Comment by Donna-Repub on December 29, 2011 at 11:42pm

Governor Rick Perry still has a chance, 30%-45 % of the people have not made up their minds how to vote..

CNN is bias and doesn't always report right.

Rick Santorum I like him and I am happy he is surging.

Hooray..

Conservative all the way...Blessings Donna 

Conservative Republican. That is who I am after.

Rick Perry my first choice.

Comment by Michael Colwell on December 28, 2011 at 2:33pm

A new survey of people likely to attend Iowa's Republican caucuses indicates that former House speaker Newt Gingrich's support in the state is plunging while former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum’s is surging, with support for Santorum more than tripling since the beginning of December.

According to a new CNN/Time/ORC International poll, 25% of people questioned say if the caucuses were held today, they'd most likely back former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and 22% said they would support Rep. Ron Paul of Texas. Romney's 3-point margin is within the poll's sampling error.

Meanwhile, Gingrich has plunged from 33% to 14% this month while Santorum grew to 16%. The poll’s release comes six days before the Iowa caucuses kick off Republican nominating contests.

In New Hampshire, which votes a week later, Romney still enjoys a large lead, far ahead of his nearest rival.

 

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